How Much Money is “Enough?”

When it comes to real estate, we are told it is all about location, location, location. When it comes to money, we are told we need more, more, more. However, this begs the question, “How much is enough?” Through the use of our personal investment management strategies and individual financial planning, we can help you answer this question; for yourself and your family.

The messages we receive every day, from radio, television, and all over the internet teaches us to focus on always striving for “More.” But, how much is enough? How much is enough to eliminate the fear of running out of money? How much is enough for us to relax and be happy? (more…)

Take 3: Three easy ways to save more money

No, you don’t have to give up your Starbucks. Honest. I’m not a big Starbucks fan, and even I really dislike that advice, which seems to be common in this belt-tightening economy. What could be less motivating than the idea that saving money requires denying yourself something you enjoy?

I approach saving from the other end of the spectrum: I’m much more motivated to grow my money when I know I’m working toward a meaningful goal. That’s true for my clients, too. Some are dreaming of a trip to Maui or a brilliant piece of jewelry. Others have their eye on a home remodel or a significant college fund for their children.

Whatever your objective, saving money, just like dieting, is bound to be counterproductive when it becomes all about deprivation. Here are three creative ideas to help you painlessly spend less so you have more for what matters most: (more…)

Five Steps To Financial Freedom, Or How Any Mom Can Get Her Financial Act Together

If your “to-do” pile contains a bulging file of paperwork for your tax return, you have plenty of company. The months leading up to April 15 are when everyone gathers and reviews their W-2 forms, investment statements and donation receipts.

These first few months the year—when your finances are front and center—is the perfect opportunity to start (or continue) building financial security. There’s nothing more powerful and comforting than feeling confident about your financial future.

If you’re stuck or don’t know where to begin, these five steps will get you moving: (more…)

Finding the right financial planner

You have decided it is time to find a financial planner. You may have even asked your CPA, your estate planning attorney or a financially savvy friend or two for a referral.

How do you evaluate those referrals or perhaps broaden your search?

Here are 5 terrific resources to guide you in your search.

The Financial Planning Association (www.fpanet.org) is the most widely recognized professional organization for Certified Financial Planners. This is the only industry site that consistently indicates any income and/or asset minimums a financial planner requires for new clients. This level of detail is helpful because some advisors do not post this information on their websites. (more…)

Successful Aging Requires “Whole Life” Planning

We often equate preparing for old age with achieving the financial security needed to sustain us throughout life.  However, a truly successful and fulfilling aging experience requires planning and preparation in all areas of life.

Financial planning is indeed important, but money alone cannot “buy” happiness, good health, meaningful relationships, and purposeful activities.  In The Late-Start Investor, John Wasik wrote:

“Instead of absorbing an obsolete view of retirement, you should consider what I call your New Prosperity.  This includes a flexible life plan that provides for your financial, vocational, physical, emotional, and spiritual needs.  Unless you look at your future holistically, merely saving up a pile of money will be a meaningless act.” (more…)

Better Financial Advice: New Approaches Gain Traction

 Financial Therapy

Getting people to feel less stressed when thinking, talking, and making decisions about money is the goal of Financial Therapy; a combination of psychology and financial advice that is focused on developing healthy relationships with money.

While a financial counselor usually comes in at a point of crisis—like bankruptcy or intractable financial conflicts between spouses—the role of a financial therapist is to help us understand the stories we tell ourselves, true or not, about money.  These “money scripts” usually reside outside of our consciousness, and act as an invisible force guiding our thoughts, feelings, and decisions about money. (more…)